Truffles are really Quite Strange

Truffles are strange little individuals. They look pretty funky and smell really strongly. Staring at one, you would either think that it came from outer space or a cow.
I haven’t tasted the ones in France or Italy, but have recently been introduced to those in Istria in great abundance, where the market seems largely locked up by a one Zigante. Even still at any farmers’ market, you’ll find people selling them privately or opening up their coat to sell you some black market style because in theory, truffle hunting is supposed to be tightly regulated in Croatia, but countless hoards do it out of the bounds of the government oversight. Just listen for the sounds of dogs (or ‘brek’ as these type are called in Croatian) roaming the countryside in the fall when they harvest.
As for the taste, it’s an acquired flavor. For those living in Europe, not so much, since they’ve been tasting them most of their lives. I at first didn’t care for truffles due to the smell, but once you get that flavor in your mouth, it’s true that they are hard to let go of. But, since they seem to be grown many places throughout the world these days, you can taste them as often as you want as long as you’re willing to pay. And that’s the catch because they could easily plant more trees where the truffles like to grown, but they won’t because it would drop the cost of the little buggers.
Some people get crazy about truffles and imbue them with all of these holistic aspects like the fact they’re in aphrodisiac. In reality, I doubt any of this and if they cost as much as the common potato, people would think a lot less of them. Still, I do enjoy them and if there is the option on the menu to get a dish with truffles on it, I’ll give it a try. I just don’t do it all the time, because there is great truth in having too much of a good thing.
Truffles are really Quite Strange