So, I’m an IT (Information Technology) guy, which means that at my workplace I’m responsible for just about everything that gets plugged in. This in turn means that I’m responsible for email as well. Obviously there are quite a few steps between a wall plug and an email system, but that’s pretty boring to the normal person. Anyways, being responsible for email means that I’m responsible for Spam. In case you ahven’t noticed, or have a brilliant email provider, Spam is getting to be one hell of a monster these days and is infiltrating every email account there is. Naturally, I’m not responsible for the amount of Spam, but I am indeed responsible for keeping it out of everyone’s way.
Naturally, people have started figuring out ways to stop Spam and I use these ways. I’m not too thrilled by the system that I use, but it works pretty well, generally catching about 250,000 unwanted messages in a given month. Here’s the funny thing though; I can crank up the filtering system more than what I have it and this result in nearly no Spam. You’d think, “Oh, then the answer is easy. Crank that puppy up.” But, no. No, you can’t do that, because if you do, then people automatically assume that email isn’t working because they’re getting no Spam. Weird huh?
It’s perplexed me for some time and I think that the answer lies in the fact that people need this Spam, crap email in order to verify that they exist somehow. It’s a bizarre thing, but I know that when I didn’t get any junk mail for credit offers via standard postal mail, I wondered if my mail had bben stolen. We seem to be creating this constant hum in our lives that we require to keep us afloat some kind of an information life preserver. Without it, we apparently cease to exist.
I can’t really tie this in to anything in the past, since I think that’s its a new occurence in the being called human. It’s unfortunate too, but honestly, it may come down to the fact that it’s just a coping mechanism we use so that we don’t go insane in the end.
Whatever. Let a couple Spam through I say. Without them, people feel stranded.