Paris Metro stations are like navigating a hangover

Ah, le métro parisien. Je l’adore! The grid is massive and the stations so well placed in the center of the city that you really can get anywhere quite fast and orderly. The only issue is in how they laid out the various lines. This of course is the system’s strength because if a train breaks down on one like, it doesn’t completely cripple the system like is the case with BART in San Francsco (which actually isn’t a metro, but more of a RER system anyways.) Different lines simply don’t share tracks. Each is independent, running at various levels under the ground. It’s very similar in this way to the Underground in London or most any other metro in Europe which usually started out as competing private transport lines. As opposed to BART where, to save money, station size, and passengers having to actually walk between lines, everything runs through the same platform.
The only downside with Paris is that finding your way between different lines is freakin’ dizzying. You loop up and down stairs (oh yeah, basically no escalators, which is bad news when with luggage) and eventually you find your transfer platform quite a ways from your arrival platform. Most stations, it’s decently manageable, but a major terminus point such as Republique, which has five different lines shuttling through it, is incredibly difficult to get around. Tied in to this fact is that this station seems to be constantly remodeled which means that handy dandy signs are often no where to be seen, thus leaving you to find your way via “metrosense” which is a lot like the radar that bats have, although due to its not being so developed in humans, you often find yourself on the wrong platform.
Paris Metro stations are like navigating a hangover