Jadrolinija is Mysterious at First

It was a ferry at 6AM. Six. AM! We couldn’t believe that that was when the ferry left Jelsa for Split, but it really was the time. I think we even asked the ticket agent a couple of times if that was really true. I mean, what a painfully earlier time to get up to catch a boat that takes less than an hour and a half to get to Split. But, naturally, we did it because it was the only workable option. We really wanted to go to Vis or Supetar on Brač, but these options were not given to us.
We grumbled about the the time the whole way because we were that kind of tired that just hurts. But, upon arriving in to Split, we understood the logic of the time. There, our ship pulled in, surrounded by countless others, all bearing the dull, Jadrolinija letters across their sides. So, it became readily apparent that this was an attempt at giving people a hub from which they could transfer to any of the other ships that were there. This all makes sense, but in a Communist kind of sense because most people aren’t transferring to another ferry line to continue their journey. If someone is in Split, then they will probably hop on to a bus, a train, or a city bus to go to the airport in Trogir. The real thing that people want to do is to hop from island to island, but this is really tricky with this company. For instance, to go to Vis, there is one or two ferries a week from the main port on Hvar to there. I think it must take something like a half hour to get there, since you can literally see Vis from the west end of Hvar. But no, if you want to get there easily, you need to go back in to Split and then take a ferry back out to Vis.
Jadrolinija has done a great job of centralizing their whole operation, but now they need to learn how to make it usable. They’re certainly making enough off the cost of taking cars out to the islands (100 euros to Vis) that I would think someone could stop thinking in this “It’s the customer’s pleasure to use us.” attitude that is thankfully, painfully, slowly dying out in these former Communist countries. The only problem with change at Jadrolinija is that they pretty have quite a monopoly over the whole coast, so you’re left with little choice other than them. Yay. Way to go privatization.
Jadrolinija is Mysterious at First