Hitting up peace in the Montmartre Cemetery

It’s a general given that for people in the US, death is a terribly, terribly scary thing and thus you see an entire economy based around the idea that you will never age and will never die. I mean, I saw and ad for life insurance recently and they actually said in the commercial, “if you die”. I will never understand this attitude, but after having dealt with two World Wars, the Black Death, and any other number of tragedies, Paris appears to be quite comfortable with it.
Well, it’s not that they can’t wait to die, but at the same time, they accept it as part of existence, which you can see in the cemeteries around town. They’re less a scary place of the dead and more parks of tribute. I find nothing frightening about them and actually think that they’re incredibly peaceful with amazing structures. Obviously, Père Lachaise Cemetery gets the most visitors given that it has a lot of famous graves in it like Jim Morrison’s. I checked it out two years ago and it is indeed quite cool (the cemetery, not Morrison’s grave which is quite plain), especially as you get away from these popular graves.
But, I also visited the Montmartre Cemetery just a few days ago at the recommendation of my friend, Timotheé. It has nowhere near the fame for people outside of France, but is the final resting place for a great many artists and other luminaries from Paris. For instance, Traffaut is buried there as well as others. While it doesn’t have the woodsy quality of Lachaise due to a street going over the top of it, it is still quite interesting with all these streets of the dead laid out and waiting.
Despite the frigid cold, it was a welcome change up from the unfortunate visit to Sacre Couer that I mentioned previously. It’s not that I would recommend a tour of all the Parisian cemeteries if you visit there, but still, they provide a nice escape from the hustle and bustle with their eternal stillness.
Hitting up peace in the Montmartre Cemetery