First Time at an American Embassy

I’ve traveled a decent amount at this point and while the US always recommends registering with the embassy when in a foreign country, I’ve never done it. It just seemed ridiculous. Europe is quite safe and to register just seems like you have to be some kind of an idiot if you find yourself at a point where you’re needing support or even repatriation from the embassy.
I changed my mind about this when in DR Congo. It’s a bit rocky of a country with all kind of things that can get you from disease to conflict to just getting the wrong person mad. So, I figured, hey, why not? I’ve got the time needed to stop in while in Kinshasa, so lets go register with the embassy.
Once past the guards, barbed wire, defensive structures, and screening devices, I have to say that I was treated quite well. There were a pile of Congolese in there for who knows what reason, although I would suspect immigration to the US, but I didn’t have to get in line. They just took me up to a private window, had me fill out a form and that was it.
By contrast, the Spanish Embassy was much worse. #1 Fan couldn’t even get past the idiot guard at the door despite showing a Spanish passport. For once, I was actually happy to be an American because in addition to the ease of registration, I got a “nifty” little card with important numbers an information on it. You can see it below, but I can sum up the information on the back to be, “You’re in country emerging from conflict that has numerous diseases and a severe lack of infrastructure. Don’t be an American here. Save that for Paris. Watch out, be alert, and you’ll be fine.” Admittedly, I never did find my “alternate safe area” (unless Spain counts) and I have little idea as to what the hell that consists of.
First Time at an American Embassy