Czech is a Slightly Bezerky Language

To the Czech people, there is nothing wrong with their language. There are rules and structure and verbs and nouns and adjectives and declensions and everything else that a standard language has. But firstly, it’s a Slavic language which is always daunting to English speakers with their Germanic/Romance mix. Secondly, it has rather complex pronunciation rules. Thirdly, it breaks a lot of the “norms” of other Slavic languages. Take all these things in to account and you get something that’s quite hard to learn for those who don’t grow up speaking it.
The basics are hard enough. In Serbo-Croatian, there is a š letter which is ‘sh’ sound, a č or ć that is ‘ch’, and a ž that is ‘zh’. That’s easy enough, but once you hit Czech, a great number of letters have that hatcheck on the top. Sometimes it makes a ‘sh’ sound. Sometimes it places a ‘y’ sound preceding the vowel that it appears on top of. And then sometimes, it is a sound I can’t even reproduce in text, which is this ‘rrrzzh’ thing when it appears on top of an ‘r’. The Czech are mighty proud of this sound as it doesn’t appear in Slovakian. Then there are the accents that can appear on various letters and make the stress longer on that particular letter. Ah, then there are the ‘hats’ that can appear on the ‘d’, the ‘n’ and the ‘t’, but hey, that’s about it.
Then there are the words. For the most part, for someone like me who has studied Croatian a bit and knows a dash of Russian, the words make a good deal of sense. They are Slavic based and that’s all good stuff like the fact that ‘ne’ means ‘no’. Then for some wacky reason, the word for ‘yes’ is ‘ano’ when it’s typically ‘da’ or at the very least, ‘ja’ in other Slavic languages. Beyond the fact that this means, ‘anus’ in Spanish, when they say it shortly, it’s just ‘no’, which is incredibly confusing for anyone outside the country.
Put all this together and you get a language that’s mighty tough for the outsider to ever learn to speak correctly, which is why so many never bother. But then some do and they speak it very well. These people make me ill, but it’s an illness filled with linguistic awe.
Czech is a Slightly Bezerky Language