Behold the Delicate Peacekeeping Force

Behold the Delicate Peacekeeping Force

On my other blog (which by the way, is a Porsche), I have a regular feature I do called, Misworded Mondays. On the most recent post, I wrote about the term, Peacekeeping Force because one day, I leaned back in armchair as I’m wont to do and pondered for bit, mental pipe in hand. Suddenly, I came up with the fact that this term (which surely was US sponsored because it sounds so incredibly cool), is really stupid. Like I said in my article on the other blog, you’re either an entity for fighting or an entity for development. There really isn’t an in between ground as you can’t really do both things at the same time. I mean, how you be destroyin’ stuff/people/places while at the same time improvin’ the same stuff/people/places.

There isn’t much more to add to this other than to say it’s possibly part of the reason for our “aid economy” that the Western nations have created through a half century of occupying and keeping an eye on Africa. I got to thinking about all of this in the last week or so with a number of articles and reactions coming out about the salaries that aid workers make. I’m assuming this has been prompted by bottom lines of aid agencies coming up short in these “tough [effin’] times”. I still stand by my assertion that free market economic salary systems can absolutely not be be applied to the labor force of aid NGO’s as NGO’s don’t function in a supply and demand model. But in reality, I’m kinda tired of it. As I’m working to form an NGO and working for free to do it, I realize that non of these things are really going to change while we have things like Peacekeeping Forces. There are so many inherent systems that supply the aid money food chain currently that we’ll need a complete upheaval of the approach and a replacement of a great many people in order to create something sensible. Will this happen in 2009 once Obama is in office? Will this “savior” and new Lincoln change everything? Eh, probably not, but let’s see where things start to go come February.